Top 10 Books Every Programmer Should Read

working effectively with legacy code

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This list used to the “Most Recommended Books in StackOverflow” and
I often refer to this list at http://www.dev-books.com/, but the site is no longer available.
and the only related reference to that now is this blog post showing how the author made the site
https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/i-analyzed-every-book-ever-mentioned-on-stack-overflow-here-are-the-most-popular-ones-eee0891f1786/

  1. working effectively with legacy code – Michael Feathers
  2. Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software – “The Gang of Four”
  3. Clean Code – Robert Martin
  4. Java Concurrency in Practice – Brian Goetz
  5. Domain Driven Design – Eric Evans
  6. JavaScript: The Good Parts – Douglas Crockford
  7. Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture: Martin Fowler
  8. Code Complete – Steve McConnell
  9. Refactoring – Martin Fowler
  10. Head First Design Patterns: A Brain-Friendly GuideĀ  – Eric Freema

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If you want to make the most out of this COVID19 Lockdown you may opt to get these books in Kindle format from Amazon

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these 10 Ebooks (Kindle) will be around $304 in total but is definitely a solid investment for your software development career. The price might seem high for some but trust me, wasting your years doing on unguided,non-standard methodologies is more wasteful.

i have only read 3 of these and the others are still on my shelf,

Working Effectively with Legacy Code is the only resource that gave me a solid definition of what legacy code is and with that the knowledge on how to prevent having legacy code and improving the maintainability of any software project.

Clean Code helped me a lot especially when my career shifted to being just a web developer to being a techlead (from doing most coding to doing code reviews, setting quality standards, automating code reviews, ci/cd)

Domain Driven Design helped me build modular systems which is very important in this age of microservices. I’d argue that everyone who wants to do microservices needs to read this one first. Being a Systems Admininistrator of a Kubernetes-based Architecture, DDD helps me create better microservice designs along with the development teamsĀ 

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